Minnesota’s New Voices bill set to advance in House, faces rougher waters in Senate

Emma Yarger, a student journalist at the Echo at St. Louis Park High School testifies in support of the Minnesota New Voices bill moving through the statehouse. Credit: Grace Farley, The Echo

MINNESOTA - A New Voices bill that would protect student journalists in grades six through 12 is making its way to the House floor of the Minnesota Statehouse. The bill, HF1868, was first introduced four years ago. It took a change of party control in the House, and the bill’s author becoming chair of the… Continue reading Minnesota’s New Voices bill set to advance in House, faces rougher waters in Senate

PODCAST: New Voices advocates talk struggles and successes

Missouri supporters Mitch Eden, Jack Rintoul, Rep. Deb Lavender, Thora Pearson and Maddie Meyers Photo by: Hannah Hall, Lavender's Chief of Staff
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Cory Dawson: Since 1988, student reporters have lived under a Supreme Court ruling that gives school administrators vast control over what goes into their school’s newspapers. Since then, students, advocates and media advisers have worked to put press freedoms for student journalists into law by passing New Voices laws in 14 states. These laws  protect… Continue reading PODCAST: New Voices advocates talk struggles and successes

A record number of states have introduced New Voices bills in 2019

More bills protecting the First Amendment rights of student journalists are moving through statehouses than ever before, according to a Student Press Law Center tally. The 11 bills are part of a nationwide effort to pass “New Voices” bills in state legislatures, which effectively counteract and clarify the limits of the 1988 Hazelwood School District… Continue reading A record number of states have introduced New Voices bills in 2019

Keefe v. Adams et al.

In December 2012, former nursing student Craig Keefe was expelled from Central Lakes College’s Associate Degree Nursing Program for Facebook posts he made, including one in which he described a classmate as a "stupid bitch." The Facebook posts were made on Keefe’s personal account, but were reported to an instructor by two students in November 2012 after they were made uncomfortable by some of the language in them.